Ranking spaces for predicting human movement in an urban environment

@article{Jiang2009RankingSF,
  title={Ranking spaces for predicting human movement in an urban environment},
  author={Bin Jiang},
  journal={International Journal of Geographical Information Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={23},
  pages={823 - 837}
}
  • B. Jiang
  • Published 1 December 2006
  • Computer Science
  • International Journal of Geographical Information Science
A city can be topologically represented as a connectivity graph, consisting of nodes representing individual spaces and links if the corresponding spaces are intersected. It turns out in the space syntax literature that some defined topological metrics can capture human movement rates in individual spaces. In other words, the topological metrics are significantly correlated to human movement rates, and individual spaces can be ranked by the metrics for predicting human movement. However, this… 

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