Ranibizumab for age‐related macular degeneration: a meta‐analysis of dose effects and comparison with no anti‐VEGF treatment and bevacizumab

@article{Jiang2014RanibizumabFA,
  title={Ranibizumab for age‐related macular degeneration: a meta‐analysis of dose effects and comparison with no anti‐VEGF treatment and bevacizumab},
  author={S. Jiang and C. Park and Jamie C Barner},
  journal={Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics},
  year={2014},
  volume={39}
}
Ranibizumab is used monthly or as‐needed (PRN) for the treatment of age‐related macular degeneration. However, which treatment regimen is more effective remains unknown. The objectives of this study are to: (i) compare the efficacy of monthly versus as‐needed quarterly treatment; and (ii) compare the efficacy of ranibizumab 0·5 mg treatment with: (a) no anti‐vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF); (b) ranibizumab 0·3 mg; and (c) bevacizumab. 
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