Randomized-controlled trials in people at ultra high risk of psychosis: A review of treatment effectiveness

@article{Preti2010RandomizedcontrolledTI,
  title={Randomized-controlled trials in people at ultra high risk of psychosis: A review of treatment effectiveness},
  author={Antonio Preti and Matteo Cella},
  journal={Schizophrenia Research},
  year={2010},
  volume={123},
  pages={30-36}
}
  • A. Preti, M. Cella
  • Published 1 October 2010
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Schizophrenia Research
Randomized controlled trial of interventions for young people at ultra-high risk of psychosis: twelve-month outcome.
TLDR
The lower than expected, essentially equivalent transition rates in all 3 groups fail to provide support for the first-line use of antipsychotic medications in patients at ultra-high risk of psychosis, and an initial approach with supportive therapy is likely to be effective and carries fewer risks.
Lack of evidence to favor specific preventive interventions in psychosis: a network meta‐analysis
TLDR
There is no evidence that any specific intervention is particularly effective over the others in preventing transition to psychosis, and sensitivity analyses controlling for different clustering of interventions did not materially affect the interpretation of the results.
[Interventions in people at risk of developing first episode psychosis: a survey of current randomised controlled studies].
TLDR
Seven completed randomised controlled trials of interventions for individuals at high risk of developing first episode psychosis evaluated antipsychotics, neuroprotective agents, cognitive behavioural and integrated treatment approaches, with mixed results.
Cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis prevention: a systematic review and meta-analysis
TLDR
CBT-informed treatment is associated with a reduced risk of transition to psychosis at 6, 12 and 18–24 months, and reduced symptoms at 12 months, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Preventing a first episode of psychosis: Meta-analysis of randomized controlled prevention trials of 12month and longer-term follow-ups
Preventive Treatments for Psychosis: Umbrella Review (Just the Evidence)
TLDR
Prevention of psychosis from a CHR-P state has been, and should remain, the primary outcome of interventional research, refined and complemented by other clinically meaningful outcomes.
Cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis prevention
TLDR
CBT-informed treatment is associated with a reduced risk of transition to psychosis at 6, 12 and 18-24 months, and reduced symptoms at 12 months, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis.
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Medium term follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of interventions for young people at ultra high risk of psychosis
Randomized controlled trial of interventions designed to reduce the risk of progression to first-episode psychosis in a clinical sample with subthreshold symptoms.
TLDR
More specific pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy reduces the risk of early transition to psychosis in young people at ultra-high risk, although their relative contributions could not be determined.
Intervention in individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis: a review and future directions.
TLDR
It is argued that the clinical staging model provides a framework for the rationale and design of such studies, with simpler, safer, and more benign interventions being better candidates for first-line treatment, while more complex and potentially harmful treatments should be reserved for those cases in which response has failed to occur.
Three-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of cognitive therapy for the prevention of psychosis in people at ultrahigh risk.
TLDR
Cognitive therapy significantly reduced the likelihood of making progression to psychosis as defined on the PANSS over 3 years after controlling for baseline cognitive factors, suggesting that it is an efficacious intervention for people at high risk of developing psychosis.
Cognitive therapy for the prevention of psychosis in people at ultra-high risk
TLDR
Cognitive therapy appears to be an acceptable and efficacious intervention for people at high risk of developing psychosis.
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TLDR
A differential predictive clinical model of transition to first-episode psychosis is developed that identified an increased risk of psychosis with appropriate prognostic accuracy in a sample of help-seeking patients.
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TLDR
The nearly significant differences suggest that olanzapine might reduce the conversion rate and delay onset of psychosis, and was efficacious for positive prodromal symptoms but induced weight gain.
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Randomized controlled multicentre trial of cognitive behaviour therapy in the early initial prodromal state: effects on social adjustment post treatment
TLDR
This study explores the effect of specific cognitive behaviour therapy as compared with supportive counselling on social adjustment in people in a potential early initial prodromal state of psychosis (EIPS) primarily defined by self‐experienced cognitive thought and perception deficits (basic symptoms).
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