Randomized controlled trial of pelvic floor muscle training with or without biofeedback for urinary incontinence

@article{Hirakawa2012RandomizedCT,
  title={Randomized controlled trial of pelvic floor muscle training with or without biofeedback for urinary incontinence},
  author={Tomoe Hirakawa and Shigeyuki Suzuki and Kumiko Kato and Momokazu Gotoh and Yoko Yoshikawa},
  journal={International Urogynecology Journal},
  year={2012},
  volume={24},
  pages={1347-1354}
}
Introduction and hypothesisTo compare the effects of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), with or without biofeedback (BF), for stress urinary incontinence (SUI), focusing on condition-specific quality of life (QOL) outcomes.MethodsWomen with SUI were randomized to PFMT with BF (BF group, n = 23) or without BF (PFMT group, n = 23) for 12 weeks. As primary outcome measures, subjective symptoms and QOL were assessed by the King’s Health Questionnaire (KHQ) and International Consultation on… Expand
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Short-term results demonstrated that PFMT with and without VT exercises had similar effectiveness on the symptoms of SUI and QoL. Expand
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PFMT with BF does not offer therapeutic benefits over alternative interventions (no training, PFMT alone and vaginal electrical stimulation) for the treatment of female SUI and was no better than alternative interventions in terms of muscle strength measured using a perineometer. Expand
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Biofeedback-assisted PFMT is an effective therapy compared to PFMT alone for well-motivated females with mild to moderate PFD and initial clinical and electrophysiological assessments were predictive for female improvement. Expand
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Findings indicate that use of magnetic innervation does not improve lower urinary tract symptoms, health-related quality of life, sexual function, and pelvic floor Muscle strength when compared to pelvic floor muscle training alone. Expand
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Considering the studies available so far are weak the evidence for the use of PFMT in the treatment of urinary symptoms in elderly women is weak. Expand
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Improvement is observed in such QoL domains as the performance of household duties, physical activity and travelling, social limitations, emotions, sleep problems and fatigue, the frequency of changing panty liners, fluid intake control, and embarrassment. Expand
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TLDR
The PFM and SM exercise was proven to be more effective than the PFM exercise alone when performed by women with SUI in their premenopausal period, with a gynoidal body type, and in the case of women who gave birth less than three times. Expand
Conservative Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Systematic Review with Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.
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There is evidence of the use of PFMT on the treatment of SUI, with and without biofeedback, and the association of IES with PFMT may improve the efficacy of the latter for QoL and pad test, but the results of individual studies were not consistent. Expand
Physical activity and pelvic floor muscle training in patients with pelvic organ prolapse: a pilot study
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Although PFMT changed PFM strength symptoms, and QOL, there were no changes for any physical activity parameters before and after PFMT, probably because the physical activity levels in patients with mild to moderate POP were almost same as in age-matched healthy women. Expand
Quality of Life in Women with Stage 1 Stress Urinary Incontinence after Application of Conservative Treatment—A Randomized Trial
TLDR
Patients with stage 1 SUI, both from Group A and from Group B, showed a significant improvement in most QoL domains measured with ICIQ LUTSQoL, however, more beneficial effects of the training were observed in the group subjected to PFM exercises with TrA tension. Expand
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PFM exercises are effective for the treatment of USI; the biofeedback method revealed better PFM strength results with respect to digital palpation. Expand
Effect of Adding Biofeedback to Pelvic Floor Muscle Training to Treat Urodynamic Stress Incontinence
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Cure rate was high, and the reduction in urinary leakage after treatment was statistically significant in both groups, however, there was no statistically significant difference in the effect of individual pelvic floor muscle training with and without biofeedback. Expand
Management of Stress Urinary Incontinence With Surface Electromyography–Assisted Biofeedback in Women of Reproductive Age
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A relatively short-term intervention of PFME with sEMG-assisted biofeedback appeared to be helpful in relieving symptoms of SUI in premenopausal women and represents a reasonable conservative management option. Expand
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Preliminary results show a significant improvement compared with the PFMT-alone group in PFMT outcome measures in patients using electromyography-assisted biofeedback training. Expand
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TLDR
Women who received biofeedback were significantly more likely to report that their urinary incontinence was cured or improved compared to those who received PFMT alone, and it was common for women in the bio feedback arms to have more contact with the health professional than those in the non-biofeedback arms. Expand
Comparative Analysis of Biofeedback and Physical Therapy for Treatment of Urinary Stress Incontinence in Women
TLDR
Four weeks of both intensive group physical therapy or individual biofeedback training followed by an unsupervised home exercise program for 2 mo are effective therapies for female urinary stress incontinence and result in a significantly reduced nocturnal urinary frequency and improved subjective outcome. Expand
Determining the optimal pelvic floor muscle training regimen for women with stress urinary incontinence
TLDR
The present evidence in terms of the effectiveness of different PFM training regimens in women with SUI is reviewed and the current literature on PFM dysfunction in SUI women is discussed, including the up‐to‐date evidence on skeletal muscle training theory and other factors known to impact on women's participation in and adherence to P FM training. Expand
Biofeedback and physiotherapy versus physiotherapy alone in the treatment of genuine stress urinary incontinence
TLDR
The study showed a statistically significant better improvement in the biofeedback group and the long-term effect in theBiofeedback groups seemed better and the patients were more motivated for training afterwards. Expand
Pelvic floor muscle training versus no treatment, or inactive control treatments, for urinary incontinence in women.
TLDR
Overall, the review provides some support for the widespread recommendation that PFMT be included in first-line conservative management programmes for women with stress, urge, or mixed, urinary incontinence. Expand
Assessment of pelvic floor muscle contraction in stress urinary incontinent women: comparison between transabdominal ultrasound and perineometry
TLDR
TA ultrasound measurement may be an alternative measurement to perineometry when assessing PFM function, and high reliability was found for measurements. Expand
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