Randomised controlled trial of two brief interventions against long-term benzodiazepine use: outcome of intervention

@article{Heather2004RandomisedCT,
  title={Randomised controlled trial of two brief interventions against long-term benzodiazepine use: outcome of intervention},
  author={Nick Heather and Alison J. Bowie and Heather Ashton and Brian R. Mcavoy and Ian Spencer and Jennifer Brodie and David R. Giddings},
  journal={Addiction Research \& Theory},
  year={2004},
  volume={12},
  pages={141 - 154}
}
Previous studies have reported that a letter from the patient's General Practitioner (GP) and a short GP consultation led to reduced intake among long-term benzodiazepine (BZD) users, with no evidence of a deterioration in general or mental health. We aimed to replicate these earlier findings in a single, prospective RCT and compare the effectiveness of the two brief interventions. 273 long-term BZD users (≥6 mos) identified from repeat prescription computer records of 7 general practices were… 
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