Random settlement of female pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca: significance of male territory size

@article{Dale1990RandomSO,
  title={Random settlement of female pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca: significance of male territory size},
  author={Svein Dale and Tore Slagsvold},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1990},
  volume={39},
  pages={231-243}
}
Abstract In a study of the pied flycatcher the availability of nest sites, and hence the territory size of males, was manipulated. The number of females that a male attracted was positively correlated with his territory size; males in a low-density plot attracted more females than males in a high-density plot. A partial correlation analysis showed that territory size was the single most important determinant of male mating success, at least late in the season. If females actively choose between… Expand
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