Random Generation of Combinatorial Structures from a Uniform Distribution

@article{Jerrum1986RandomGO,
  title={Random Generation of Combinatorial Structures from a Uniform Distribution},
  author={Mark Jerrum and Leslie G. Valiant and Vijay V. Vazirani},
  journal={Theor. Comput. Sci.},
  year={1986},
  volume={43},
  pages={169-188}
}

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