Raising Rice Yields and Beyond: An Experience of Collective Learning and Innovation in Lowland Rice Systems in Madagascar

  • Toon Defoer
  • Published 2013

Abstract

(eds M.C.S. Wopereis et al.) 379 2000, 2001). Similar results were obtained in Burkina Faso (Segda et al., 2004, 2005). (See also Tollens et al., Chapter 1, this volume.) Irrigated systems in these areas are relatively uniform, with good infrastructure and farmers are reasonably well organized. Under these circumstances, relatively ‘fixed’ options and recommendations were communicated to farmers through training of extension staff and promotional campaigns (field days, rural radio). Encouraged by the results in the Sahel, AfricaRice moved the work on IRM to rainfed lowland systems in Côte d’Ivoire. After one year of testing various soil-fertility and weed management options at different inland valley sites, however, it was realized that the diversity and variability in the conditions was too great to adopt the same approach as for the Sahelian irrigated systems. The variability of inland valleys means that farmers require flexible technologies that can be adapted to a range of growth conditions. Development of technologies needs to involve farmers at a very early stage; to ensure farmer involvement in technology development, a participatory learning and action-research Introduction

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Defoer2013RaisingRY, title={Raising Rice Yields and Beyond: An Experience of Collective Learning and Innovation in Lowland Rice Systems in Madagascar}, author={Toon Defoer}, year={2013} }