Rain driven by receding ice sheets as a cause of past climate change

@article{Eisenman2009RainDB,
  title={Rain driven by receding ice sheets as a cause of past climate change},
  author={Ian Eisenman and Cecilia M. Bitz and Eli Tziperman},
  journal={Paleoceanography},
  year={2009},
  volume={24}
}
[1] The Younger Dryas cold period, which interrupted the transition from the last ice age to modern conditions in Greenland, is one of the most dramatic incidents of abrupt climate change reconstructed from paleoclimate proxy records. Changes in the Atlantic Ocean overturning circulation in response to freshwater fluxes from melting ice are frequently invoked to explain this and other past climate changes. Here we propose an alternative mechanism in which the receding glacial ice sheets cause… 
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