Rails of the world : a compilation of new information, 1975-1983 (Aves: Rallidae)

@inproceedings{Ripley1985RailsOT,
  title={Rails of the world : a compilation of new information, 1975-1983 (Aves: Rallidae)},
  author={Sidney Dillon Ripley and Bruce McP Beehler},
  year={1985}
}
Ripley, S. Dillon, and Bruce M. Beehler. Rails of the World, a Compilation of New Information, 1975-1983 (Aves: Rallidae). Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology, number 417, 28 pages, 2 figures, 1985.—The senior author's monographic treatment of the Rallidae, published in 1977, was based on data available to 1975. Corrections and additions to that treatment are presented here in the form of species accounts of rails, following the sequence presented in Rails of the World (Ripley, 1977). Relevant… 

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