Raging at imaginary Don-Quixotes : a reply to Giraud and Weintraub

@inproceedings{Tyfield2009RagingAI,
  title={Raging at imaginary Don-Quixotes : a reply to Giraud and Weintraub},
  author={David Tyfield},
  year={2009}
}
In my article 'The impossibility of finitism: from SSK to ESK?' (Tyfield 2008), I argued that the sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK) is an important, indeed necessary, precursor of an economics of scientific knowledge (ESK), opening the way for the empirical exploration of the impact of economic factors on the production of scientific knowledge. Without SSK's arguments for the irreducible social-situatedness of science, such an ESK would be precluded, as explaining the development of… CONTINUE READING

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