Radon in soil gas and its relationship with some major faults of SW England.

Abstract

The south-west of England was designated by the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) as the first 'Radon Affected Area', as over 1% of the housing stock is estimated to have an indoor radon concentration in excess of the 200 Bq m(-3) Action Level. The situation is even worse for houses situated above uraniferous granite intrusions, where over 30% are thought to be above the Action Level.The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the level of radon in soil gas and the local geology. Particularly high radon levels were measured along major fault zones. This could be explained by: increased rate of migration of the radon due to the permeable fault, the presence of radium or radon-bearing ground water within the fault, or secondary uranium mineralisation. Seasonal variations are also considered.

DOI: 10.1007/BF02627832

Cite this paper

@article{Varley1993RadonIS, title={Radon in soil gas and its relationship with some major faults of SW England.}, author={Nick R . Varley and Amber Flowers}, journal={Environmental geochemistry and health}, year={1993}, volume={15 2-3}, pages={145-51} }