Radon and carbon dioxide around remote Himalayan thermal springs

@article{Girault2016RadonAC,
  title={Radon and carbon dioxide around remote Himalayan thermal springs},
  author={Fr{\'e}d{\'e}ric Girault and Bharat Prasad Koirala and Mukunda Bhattarai and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}ric Perrier},
  journal={Special Publications},
  year={2016},
  volume={451},
  pages={155 - 181}
}
Abstract Radon-222 and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions were studied around four remote Nepalese thermal springs near the Main Central Thrust: Timure and Chilime in the upper Trisuli Valley, central Nepal; and Sulighad and Tarakot in Lower Dolpo, western Nepal. A total of 279 radon fluxes and 670 CO2 fluxes were measured on the ground, complemented by radon concentration measurements in soil and water, and assisted by thermal infrared imaging. In Lower Dolpo, mean radon fluxes ranging from 270×10… 
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