Radio emission from the unusual supernova 1998bw and its association with the γ-ray burst of 25 April 1998

@article{Kulkarni1998RadioEF,
  title={Radio emission from the unusual supernova 1998bw and its association with the $\gamma$-ray burst of 25 April 1998},
  author={Shrinivas R. Kulkarni and Dale A. Frail and Mark Hendrik Wieringa and R. D. Ekers and Elaine M. Sadler and R. M. Wark and J. Higdon and E. S. Phinney and Joshua S. Bloom},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1998},
  volume={395},
  pages={663-669}
}
Data accumulated over the past year strongly favour the idea that γ-ray bursts lie at cosmological distances, although the nature of the power source remains unclear. Here we report radio observations of the supernova SN1998bw, which exploded at about the same time, and in about the same direction, as the γ-ray burst GRB980425. At its peak, the supernova was unusually luminous at radio wavelengths. A simple interpretation of the data requires that the source expanded with an apparent velocity… 
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