Radiation and speciation of pelagic organisms during periods of global warming: the case of the common minke whale, Balaenoptera acutorostrata

@article{Pastene2007RadiationAS,
  title={Radiation and speciation of pelagic organisms during periods of global warming: the case of the common minke whale, Balaenoptera acutorostrata},
  author={Luis A. Pastene and Mutsuo Goto and Naohisa Kanda and Alexandre N. Zerbini and Dani Kerem and Kazuo Watanabe and Yoshitaka Bessho and Masami Hasegawa and Rasmus Nielsen and Finn Larsen and PER J. Palsb{\o}ll},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2007},
  volume={16}
}
How do populations of highly mobile species inhabiting open environments become reproductively isolated and evolve into new species? We test the hypothesis that elevated ocean‐surface temperatures can facilitate allopatry among pelagic populations and thus promote speciation. Oceanographic modelling has shown that increasing surface temperatures cause localization and reduction of upwelling, leading to fragmentation of feeding areas critical to pelagic species. We test our hypothesis by genetic… 

Evolutionary history of the porpoises (Phocoenidae) across the speciation continuum: a mitogenome phylogeographic perspective

TLDR
It is shown that the spectacled and Burmeister’s porpoises share a more recent common ancestor than with the vaquita that diverged from southern species during the Pliocene, suggesting that the mechanism(s) driving species diversification in the relatively well-known species from the northern hemisphere may apply also to the poorly-known southern species.

Postglacial climate changes and rise of three ecotypes of harbour porpoises, Phocoena phocoena, in western Palearctic waters

TLDR
It is shown that allopatric divergence can occur in these highly mobile species and be a source of genetic diversity and the impacts that climate change may have on the distribution and speciation process in pelagic predators are highlighted.

Population structure and possible migratory links of common minke whales, Balaenoptera acutorostrata, in the Southern Hemisphere

TLDR
The genetic evidence presented here was consistent with the hypothesis of migratory links among Brazil, Chilean Patagonia and the Antarctic Peninsula, and between low-latitude and Antarctic waters of the WSP, which may have conservation as well as taxonomic implications.

Evolutionary diversification in the marine realm: a global case study with marine mammals

Speciation is thought to be predominantly driven by the geographical separation of populations of the ancestral species. Yet, in the marine realm, there is substantial biological diversity despite a

Mitochondrial genomics reveals the evolutionary history of the porpoises (Phocoenidae) across the speciation continuum

TLDR
It is found that spectacled and Burmeister’s porpoises shared a more recent common ancestor than with the vaquita that diverged from southern species during the Pliocene, suggesting similar mechanisms are driving species diversification in northern and southern species.

Influences of past climatic changes on historical population structure and demography of a cosmopolitan marine predator, the common dolphin (genus Delphinus)

TLDR
The results suggest that short‐beaked common dolphins are likely to have originated in the eastern Indo‐Pacific Ocean during the Pleistocene and expanded into the Atlantic Ocean through the Indian Ocean and the North Atlantic and Pacific Ocean basins, and climate change may have on the distribution and abundance of marine predators and its ecological consequences for marine ecosystems.

Radiation of Extant Cetaceans Driven by Restructuring of the Oceans

TLDR
It is found that the toothed whales are monophyletic, suggesting that echolocation evolved only once early in that lineage some 36–34 Ma, and support is found for increased diversification rates during periods of pronounced physical restructuring of the oceans.

Out of the Pacific and Back Again: Insights into the Matrilineal History of Pacific Killer Whale Ecotypes

TLDR
The phylogenetic reconstructions indicate that in the North Pacific, sympatry between the maternal lineages that make up each ecotype arises from secondary contact, and suggest a North Pacific to North Atlantic founding event, and the later return of killer whales to the NorthPacific.

Genetic and historic evidence for climate-driven population fragmentation in a top cetacean predator: the harbour porpoises in European water

TLDR
The present results suggest that the fragmentation of harbour distribution range in the Mediterranean Sea was triggered during the warm ‘Mid-Holocene Optimum’ period (approx. 5000 years ago), by the end of the post-glacial nutrient-rich ‘Sapropel’ conditions that prevailed before that time.

Evolution and biodiversity of Antarctic organisms: a molecular perspective

  • A. Rogers
  • Environmental Science, Biology
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2007
TLDR
Genetic studies have revealed that species defined by morphological characters are complexes of cryptic or sibling species, which is consistent with the diversity and distribution of marine and terrestrial taxa having been strongly influenced by geological and climatic cooling events over the last 70 years.
...

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