Radial evolution of the April 2020 stealth coronal mass ejection between 0.8 and 1 AU. Comparison of Forbush decreases at Solar Orbiter and near the Earth

@article{Forstner2021RadialEO,
  title={Radial evolution of the April 2020 stealth coronal mass ejection between 0.8 and 1 AU. Comparison of Forbush decreases at Solar Orbiter and near the Earth},
  author={Johan L. Freiherr von Forstner and Mateja Dumbovi'c and Christian Mostl and Jingnan Guo and Athanasios Papaioannou and Robert Elftmann and Zigong Xu and J. C. Terasa and Alexander L. Kollhoff and Robert F. Wimmer–Schweingruber and J. Rodr'iguez-Pacheco and Andreas J. Weiss and J{\"u}rgen Hinterreiter and Tanja Amerstorfer and Maike Bauer and Anatoly V. Belov and Maria Abunina and Timothy S. Horbury and Emma E. Davies and Helen O’Brien and Robert C. Allen and G. Bruce Andrews and Lars Berger and Sebastian Boden and Ignacio Cernuda Cangas and Sandra Eldrum and Francisco Espinosa Lara and R. Herrero and John R. Hayes and George C. Ho and Shrinivas R. Kulkarni and William J. Lees and C. P. Mart'in and Glenn M. Mason and Daniel Pacheco and Manuel Prieto Mateo and Al{\'i} Ravanbakhsh and {\'O}scar R. Polo and Sebasti{\'a}n Prieto and Charles E. Schlemm and Helmut Seifert and K. T. Tyagi and M. Yedla},
  journal={Astronomy \& Astrophysics},
  year={2021}
}
Aims. We present observations of the first coronal mass ejection (CME) observed by the Solar Orbiter spacecraft on April 19, 2020 and the associated Forbush decrease (FD) measured by the High Energy Telescope (HET). This CME is a multi-spacecraft event that was also seen near Earth the following day. Methods. We highlight the capabilities of the HET for observing small short-term variations of the galactic cosmic ray count rate using its single detector counters. We applied the analytical… 

Solar origins of a strong stealth CME detected by Solar Orbiter

Aims. We aim to locate the origin of a stealth coronal mass ejection (CME) detected in situ by the MAG instrument on board Solar Orbiter and make connections between the CME observed at the Sun and

Cosmic-ray flux predictions and observations for and with Metis on board Solar Orbiter

Context. The Metis coronagraph is one of the remote sensing instruments hosted on board the ESA/NASA Solar Orbiter mission. Metis is devoted to carry out the first simultaneous imaging of the solar

Multipoint Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Observed with Solar Orbiter, BepiColombo, Parker Solar Probe, Wind, and STEREO-A

We report the result of the first search for multipoint in situ and imaging observations of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) starting with the first Solar Orbiter (SolO) data in 2020

Investigating Remote-Sensing Techniques to Reveal Stealth Coronal Mass Ejections

Eruptions of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the Sun are usually associated with a number of signatures that can be identified in solar disc imagery. However, there are cases in which a CME that

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