Racketed tail of the male and female turquoise-browed motmot: male but not female tail length correlates with pairing success, performance, and reproductive success

@article{Murphy2006RacketedTO,
  title={Racketed tail of the male and female turquoise-browed motmot: male but not female tail length correlates with pairing success, performance, and reproductive success},
  author={Troy G Murphy},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={61},
  pages={911-918}
}
  • Troy G Murphy
  • Published 6 March 2007
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Both males and females of many avian species maintain elaborate plumage traits, and elaborate monomorphic plumage may convey adaptive benefits to one or both sexes as inter- or intraspecific signals. Both sexes of the turquoise-browed motmot (Eumomota superciliosa) are elaborately plumed with long racket-tipped tail. I investigated whether the racketed tail functions as a sexually selected signal in one or both sexes by testing the predictions that males and/or females with the largest tails… 

Lack of Assortative Mating for Tail, Body Size, or Condition in the Elaborate Monomorphic Turquoise-Browed Motmot (Eumomota Superciliosa)

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The hypothesis that the tail is sexually selected in males only, and that natural selection accounts for the evolutionary maintenance of the elaborate female tail is discussed.

Tail-racket removal increases hematocrit in male Turquoise-browed Motmots (Eumomota superciliosa)

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Identifying female phenotypes that promote behavioral isolation in a sexually dimorphic species of fish Etheostoma zonale

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It is found that the region above the lateral line is important in mediating male mate preferences, with males spending a significantly greater proportion of time with animations exhibiting conspecific female patterning in this region than with animations displaying heterospecificfemale patterning.

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ADAPTIVE SIGNIFICANCE OF ELABORATE PLUMAGE WHEN EXPRESSED IN BOTH SEXES: MULTIPLE FUNCTIONS OF THE RACKETED-TAIL OF THE TURQUOISE-BROWED MOTMOT (EUMOMOTA SUPERCILIOSA)

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The possibility that the tail is sexually selected in only males, and the evolutionary maintenance of the elaborate female tail is discussed, are discussed and presented.

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TLDR
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Lack of Assortative Mating for Tail, Body Size, or Condition in the Elaborate Monomorphic Turquoise-Browed Motmot (Eumomota Superciliosa)

TLDR
The hypothesis that the tail is sexually selected in males only, and that natural selection accounts for the evolutionary maintenance of the elaborate female tail is discussed.

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TLDR
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TLDR
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