Racial Disparities in Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

@article{Gourin2006RacialDI,
  title={Racial Disparities in Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma},
  author={Christine G Gourin and Robert H. Podolsky},
  journal={The Laryngoscope},
  year={2006},
  volume={116}
}
Objectives/Hypothesis: Black patients are reported to have a higher incidence of advanced disease and increased mortality from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) but constitute the minority of patients in large‐scale studies investigating the effect of race on outcome. This study sought to determine if racial disparities exist between black and white patients with HNSCC treated at a single large institution in the South with a high proportion of black patients. 
Racial parities in outcomes after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer
Although black patients experience worse outcomes after treatment for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC), these conclusions were based on populations in which blacks comprised a
Oropharyngeal cancer as a driver of racial outcome disparities in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: 10‐year experience at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center
Racial outcome disparities have been observed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with diminished survival for black patients compared with white patients.
Racial Differences in Stage and Survival in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma
TLDR
Differences in survival between black patients and white patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCCA) are characterized.
Association of race and health care system with disease stage and survival in veterans with larynx cancer
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Black patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma historically have inferior outcomes in comparison with White patients and these racial disparities within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), an equal‐access system, and within the SEER program, which is representative of the US hybrid‐payer system.
Explaining Racial Disparities in Surgically Treated Head and Neck Cancer
TLDR
To assess the causative factors that contribute to racial disparities in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and establish the role of hospital factors in racial disparities, a large number of patients from ethnic minority backgrounds are recruited.
Racial disparities in tumor features and outcomes of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil
TLDR
To identify differences in 3‐year overall survival (OS) and disease‐free survival (DFS) based on race in patients with tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma, data are presented on race and disease-free survival.
Patient and tumor factors at diagnosis in a multi‐ethnic primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cohort
A long‐term objective is to refine patient diagnosis and prognosis to address heterogeneity in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) through incorporation of patient and tumor factors. This
Impact of race on oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma presentation and outcomes among veterans
TLDR
Examination of racial disparities in oropharyngeal SCC among veterans found no differences in human papillomavirus (HPV) status.
Impact of race/ethnicity on laryngeal cancer in patients treated at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center
TLDR
Whether equal access to laryngeal cancer care in a tertiary care Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center would result in similar survival for white and black patients is investigated.
Socioeconomic Status Drives Racial Disparities in HPV‐negative Head and Neck Cancer Outcomes
To determine drivers of the racial disparity in stage at diagnosis and overall survival (OS) between black and white patients with HPV‐negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).
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