Race and Sex Differences in the Receipt of Timely and Appropriate Lung Cancer Treatment

@article{Shugarman2009RaceAS,
  title={Race and Sex Differences in the Receipt of Timely and Appropriate Lung Cancer Treatment},
  author={Lisa R. Shugarman and Katherine Mack and Melony E S Sorbero and Haijun Tian and Arvind Kumar Jain and J. Scott Ashwood and Steven M. Asch},
  journal={Medical Care},
  year={2009},
  volume={47},
  pages={774-781}
}
Background:Previous research suggests that disparities in non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) survival can be explained in part by disparities in the receipt of cancer treatment. Few studies, however, have considered race and sex disparities in the timing and appropriateness of treatment across stages of diagnosis. Objective:To evaluate the relationship of sex and race with the receipt of timely and clinically appropriate NSCLC treatment for each stage of diagnosis. Method:Surveillance… 
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