Race/ethnicity and perinatal depressed mood

@article{Segre2006RaceethnicityAP,
  title={Race/ethnicity and perinatal depressed mood},
  author={Lisa S. Segre and Michael W. O’Hara and Mary E. Losch},
  journal={Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology},
  year={2006},
  volume={24},
  pages={106 - 99}
}
This study examined the extent to which race/ethnicity is a risk factor for depressed mood in late pregnancy and the early postpartum period apart from its relationship with other demographic and infant outcome variables. Data obtained from 26,877 women with newborns in Iowa indicate that 15.7% endorsed a single depression item. Logistic regression results indicate that race/ethnicity was a significant predictor of depressed mood, controlling for age, marital status, income and educational… Expand
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