Race, IQ, and the search for statistical signals associated with so-called “X”-factors: environments, racism, and the “hereditarian hypothesis”

@article{Kaplan2015RaceIA,
  title={Race, IQ, and the search for statistical signals associated with so-called “X”-factors: environments, racism, and the “hereditarian hypothesis”},
  author={J. Kaplan},
  journal={Biology & Philosophy},
  year={2015},
  volume={30},
  pages={1-17}
}
  • J. Kaplan
  • Published 2015
  • Psychology
  • Biology & Philosophy
  • Some authors defending the “hereditarian” hypothesis with respect to differences in average IQ scores between populations have argued that the sorts of environmental variation hypothesized by some researchers rejecting the hereditarian position should leave discoverable statistical traces, namely changes in the overall variance of scores or in variance–covariance matrices relating scores to other variables. In this paper, I argue that the claims regarding the discoverability of such statistical… CONTINUE READING
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