Race, Ethnicity and Hospitalization for Six Chronic Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions in the USA

@article{Laditka2006RaceEA,
  title={Race, Ethnicity and Hospitalization for Six Chronic Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions in the USA},
  author={James N. Laditka and Sarah B Laditka},
  journal={Ethnicity \& Health},
  year={2006},
  volume={11},
  pages={247 - 263}
}
Objectives. Hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions, also called preventable hospitalization, has been widely accepted as an indicator of access to primary health care, and of the overall success of the primary health care system. Our objective is to examine associations between preventable hospitalization and race and ethnicity in the USA, separately for six major chronic diseases: angina, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, diabetes and… Expand
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Impact of Disease Prevalence Adjustment on Hospitalization Rates for Chronic Ambulatory Care–Sensitive Conditions in Germany
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The central role of comorbidity in predicting ambulatory care sensitive hospitalizations.
TLDR
Comorbidity is far more important in predicting ACSH risk than any other factor, both for acute and chronic ACSHs, and should not be made from analyses that do not control for presence of important comorbid conditions. Expand
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