ROS as a tumour suppressor?

@article{Ramsey2006ROSAA,
  title={ROS as a tumour suppressor?},
  author={Matthew R. Ramsey and Norman E Sharpless},
  journal={Nature Cell Biology},
  year={2006},
  volume={8},
  pages={1213-1215}
}
Senescence is an important mechanism for suppressing mammalian tumours and it may also contribute to aging. A new study suggests that changes in the metabolism of oxygen radicals are important for establishing senescence and blocking cytokinesis to ensure senescent cells never divide again. 

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