ROADS AND THEIR MAJOR ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS

@article{Forman1998ROADSAT,
  title={ROADS AND THEIR MAJOR ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS},
  author={Richard T. T. Forman and Lauren E. Alexander},
  journal={Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics},
  year={1998},
  volume={29},
  pages={207-231}
}
  • R. Forman, L. E. Alexander
  • Published 1 November 1998
  • Environmental Science
  • Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics
A huge road network with vehicles ramifies across the land, representing a surprising frontier of ecology. Species-rich roadsides are conduits for few species. Roadkills are a premier mortality source, yet except for local spots, rates rarely limit population size. Road avoidance, especially due to traffic noise, has a greater ecological impact. The still-more-important barrier effect subdivides populations, with demographic and probably genetic consequences. Road networks crossing landscapes… 

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