RITUALISED FIGHTING IN THE MEAT ANT IRIDOMYRMEX PURPUREUS (SMITH) (HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE)

@article{Ettershank1982RITUALISEDFI,
  title={RITUALISED FIGHTING IN THE MEAT ANT IRIDOMYRMEX PURPUREUS (SMITH) (HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE)},
  author={George Ettershank and J. A. Ettershank},
  journal={Australian Journal of Entomology},
  year={1982},
  volume={21}
}
Workers of the meat ant establish territorial boundaries with adjoining colonies by prolonged confrontations involving ritualised fighting. The stereotyped sequence of events in the ritual is described. It is suggested that steps in this sequence are derived from solicitation for food. The energetic and evolutionary significance of ritualised fighting is discussed. 
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References

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TLDR
An isolated population was studied at Belair, in the Mt Lofty Ranges in South Australia, by mapping the distribution of nests and colony territories, which indicated that intercolonial competition was involved in the development of the distribution pattern. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Short-Term Change in a Population of the Meat Ant Iridomyrmex Purpureus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).
TLDR
Comparison of parts of the population from areas differing in aspect and drainage shows that colony size and structure are controlled by rates of growth and survival of nests, depending largely on summer and winter stress respectively. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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