REPRODUCTIVE CONFLICT IN BUMBLEBEES AND THE EVOLUTION OF WORKER POLICING

@article{Zanette2012REPRODUCTIVECI,
  title={REPRODUCTIVE CONFLICT IN BUMBLEBEES AND THE EVOLUTION OF WORKER POLICING},
  author={Lorenzo Roberto Sgobaro Zanette and Sophie D. L. Miller and Christiana M. A. Faria and Edd J Almond and Timothy J. Huggins and William C. Jordan and Andrew F. G. Bourke},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2012},
  volume={66}
}
Worker policing (mutual repression of reproduction) in the eusocial Hymenoptera represents a leading example of how coercion can facilitate cooperation. The occurrence of worker policing in “primitively” eusocial species with low mating frequencies, which lack relatedness differences conducive to policing, suggests that separate factors may underlie the origin and maintenance of worker policing. We tested this hypothesis by investigating conflict over male parentage in the primitively eusocial… Expand
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TLDR
Examination of the cause-effect relationship between queen mating frequency and worker policing indicates that worker policing is caused by queen polyandry but thatworker policing is unlikely to cause polyandries, although it may help stabilize it if police workers show behavioral dominance. Expand
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It is observed that workers, which later became dominant egg layers under queenless conditions, have more contact with the queen than other workers, and results corroborate the existence of rank relationships among workers in queenright colonies and show that results from policing experiments may be affected by the disturbance of pre-existing hierarchies through colony splitting. Expand
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TLDR
Results from the monogynous wasp Dolichovespula norwegica are presented, which show that all three kinds of policing—queen policing, worker policing and “selfish” worker policing—co-occur, and that policing workers obtained both direct fitness benefits as well as indirect (inclusive) fitness. Expand
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It is shown that worker policing by aggressive attacks against additionally reproducing workers keeps the number of reproducing Workers low, and through experimental manipulation of thenumber of brood items per colony, it is shownthat worker policing can enhance group efficiency. Expand
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TLDR
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