REINFORCEMENT OF STICKLEBACK MATE PREFERENCES: SYMPATRY BREEDS CONTEMPT

@article{Rundle1998REINFORCEMENTOS,
  title={REINFORCEMENT OF STICKLEBACK MATE PREFERENCES: SYMPATRY BREEDS CONTEMPT},
  author={Howard D. Rundle and Dolph Schluter},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={1998},
  volume={52}
}
Detailed studies of reproductive isolation and how it varies among populations can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms of speciation. Here we investigate how the strength of premating isolation varies between sympatric and allopatric populations of threespine sticklebacks to test a prediction of the hypothesis of reinforcement: that interspecific mate discrimination should be stronger in sympatry than in allopatry. In conducting such tests, it is important to control for ecological… 

REPRODUCTIVE CHARACTER DISPLACEMENT OF MALE STICKLEBACK MATE PREFERENCE: REINFORCEMENT OR DIRECT SELECTION?

  • A. AlbertD. Schluter
  • Biology, Environmental Science
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 2004
The contrast in male behavior suggests that egg predation has shaped male preferences, and direct selection is likely that it has been important in building up reproductive isolation between limnetic and benthic sticklebacks.

Speciation and the evolution of mating preferences in threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus)

It is determined that the mate preferences of the small species have shifted from preferring large females to preferring small females due either to selection against hybrids (reinforcement), or to egg predation by the larger benthic species.

BODY SIZE, NATURAL SELECTION, AND SPECIATION IN STICKLEBACKS

  • L. NagelD. Schluter
  • Biology, Environmental Science
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1998
Interspecific mate preferences in sympatric sticklebacks appears to be dominated by body size, implicating natural selection in the origin of species.

Lack of Assortative Mating Between Incipient Species of Stickleback from a Hybrid Zone

It is inferred that postmating isolation has preceded the evolution of premating isolation (assortative mating) in this population of sticklebacks and hybridisation between anadromous and freshwater stickleback from the River Tyne, Scotland, occurs readily, and that sexual selection is unlikely to contribute to premates isolation.

Reproductive character displacement between the closely related freshwater snails Lymnaea peregra and L. ovata

It is found that snails from the sympatric location avoided mating with the opposite species, while allopatric snails showed less discrimination against the oppositespecies, supporting the view that reproductive isolation may commonly be reinforced by selection when two closely related taxa occur in sympatry.

Reproductive character displacement of female mate preferences for male cuticular hydrocarbons in Drosophila subquinaria

  • H. RundleK. Dyer
  • Biology
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 2015
It is found that the direction of linear sexual selection varies significantly between populations that are sympatric versus allopatric with D. subquinaria, and differences in preference partially align with existing differences in cuticular hydrocarbons and patterns of sexual isolation.

Olfactory perception of mates in ecologically divergent stickleback: Population parallels and differences

The preference for conspecific over heterospecific odours, although not strong, may still contribute to reproductive isolation in sympatric sticklebacks, particularly through interactions with other senses and environmental properties.

SEXUAL SELECTION AGAINST HYBRIDS BETWEEN SYMPATRIC STICKLEBACK SPECIES: EVIDENCE FROM A FIELD EXPERIMENT

Sexual selection, like other mechanisms of postzygotic isolation between young sister species, may be stronger in a wild setting than in the laboratory because of habitat‐specific selection pressures.

Experimental evidence for asymmetric mate preference and aggression: behavioral interactions in a woodrat (Neotoma) hybrid zone

Patterns of mate choice in this woodrat system appear to be strongly impacted by body size and aggressive behavior, and multiple isolating mechanisms contribute to the rate of genetic exchange between these species when they come into contact, and that these mechanisms are the result of selection on traits that are important in a range of ecological and reproductive interactions.

Loss of sexual isolation in a hybridizing stickleback species pair

The first evidence that sexual isolation has been lost in the hybridizing pair is provided and it is shown that preferences females have for Conspecific mates and the traits they use to distinguish conspecific and heterospecific males contribute to this loss.
...

References

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BODY SIZE, NATURAL SELECTION, AND SPECIATION IN STICKLEBACKS

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  • Biology, Environmental Science
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1998
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