RED IMPORTED FIRE ANTS (HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) INCREASE THE ABUNDANCE OF APHIDS IN TOMATO

@inproceedings{Coppler2007REDIF,
  title={RED IMPORTED FIRE ANTS (HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) INCREASE THE ABUNDANCE OF APHIDS IN TOMATO},
  author={Laura B. Coppler and John F. Murphy and Micky D. Eubanks},
  year={2007}
}
Abstract Red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta (Buren) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), are abundant in many agroecosystems in the southern United States and can affect the abundance of arthropods in these systems. We determined the effects of red imported fire ants on the abundance of aphids, other herbivorous insects, and beneficial arthropods in Alabama tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) by manipulating the density of red imported fire ants in plots of tomato plants and by sampling fresh market… 

The red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, modifies predation at the soil surface and in cotton foliage

It is indicated that fire ant suppression is associated with decreases in the density of honeydew-producing insects, and increasing abundance of whiteflies on the plants coincided with a decrease in egg predation at the soil surface, which suggests the mutualism between ants and whiteflies may lead to a shift in predation intensity from edaphic towards plant-based food webs.

QUANTIFYING THE DOMINANCE OF LITTLE FIRE ANT (Wasmannia auropunctata) AND ITS EFFECT ON CROPS IN THE SOLOMON ISLANDS

The presence of W. auropunctata leads to a reduction in the ant fauna at a site, and is likely to lead to ecological damage to other invertebrates and vertebrates, and the presence of the Little Fire Ant in the subsistence crops may have lead to the development of harmful relationships between hemipteran pests.

Invasive Argentine ants reduce fitness of red maple via a mutualism with an endemic coccid

Investigating the effects of a mutualism between the invasive Argentine ant and the endemic terrapin scale on coccid density and the fitness of the host of this mutualism, the endemic red maple, found that red maples with Argentine ants excluded from their canopy had higher seed mass and larger early leaves indicating that this invasive ant-endemic scale mutualism imposed a net fitness cost to the host tree.

Does Mutualism Drive the Invasion of Two Alien Species? The Case of Solenopsis invicta and Phenacoccus solenopsis

Results suggest that the conditional mutualism between S. invicta and P. solenopsis facilitates population growth and fitness of both species, and may facilitate the invasion success of bothspecies.

POPULATION DENSITY OF CERTAIN PIERCING SUCKING PESTS INFESTING SOME OF SOLANACEAE PLANTS IN ISMAILIA GOVERNORATE, EGYPT

It could be concluded that through knowledge of the number of pests′ generations under study 458 AML ELHABSHY et al. that can be used in a program to forecasting pests injuries and using it in an integrated pest management program.

Mutualisms between ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and honeydew-producing insects: Are they important in ant invasions?

This possibility that the extraordinary success of invasive ants may be facilitated by facultative mutualisms with honeydew-producing insects is evaluated in a review of the literature, focusing on five invasive ants that exhibit exceptionally large populations and whose impacts are considered to be most severe.

Homopterans and an Invasive Red Ant, Myrmica rubra (L.), in Maine

ABSTRACT Myrmica rubra (L.), is an invasive ant that is spreading across eastern North America. It is presently found in over 40 communities in Maine and areas in Vermont, New Hampshire,

Effect of ant attendance on aphid population growth and above ground biomass of the aphid's host plant

This study indicates that ants not only increase aphid fitness in terms of their population growth rate, but also benefit the host plant.

Impact of the invasion of the imported fire ant

  • S. Vinson
  • Environmental Science
    Insect science
  • 2013
The impact of the imported fire ant (IFA) is complex, in large part, because several very different species of “Fire Ants” have invaded and one of these has two forms, all of which are hard to

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The results of this study show that although S. invicta may promote aphid populations early in the growing season, it is an important predator of bollworm and beet armyworm eggs later in the season.

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Interspecific association between the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren, and several insect inhabitants of east Texas cotton fields was analyzed and indicated that ants occur in combination with aphids and several hemipteran predators more frequently than expected on the basis of chance alone.

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The red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren, hereafter referred to as the imported fire ant , has received much press coverage since its introduction into the United States approximately 75

Comparative Predation of the Sugarcane Borer (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) on Sweet Sorghum and Sugarcane

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