RECONSTRUCTING THE PALEOECOLOGY OF TAUNG, SOUTH AFRICA FROM LOW MAGNIFICATION OF DENTAL MICROWEAR FEATURES IN FOSSIL PRIMATES

@inproceedings{Williams2010RECONSTRUCTINGTP,
  title={RECONSTRUCTING THE PALEOECOLOGY OF TAUNG, SOUTH AFRICA FROM LOW MAGNIFICATION OF DENTAL MICROWEAR FEATURES IN FOSSIL PRIMATES},
  author={Frank L’Engle Williams and James William Patterson},
  year={2010}
}
Abstract Taung, South Africa yielded the first Pliocene Hominini fossil, Australopithecus africanus, recovered from a lime quarry in 1924. To identify whether the habitat of the site differed from present-day conditions, dietary preferences of fossil papionins from Taung, including Parapapio antiquus (n  =  8), Papio izodi (n  =  12), and indeterminate specimens (n  =  10) were examined under low magnification to discern patterns of dental microwear. The comparative fossil sample from… 

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A COMPARISON OF MOLAR MORPHOLOGY FROM EXTANT CERCOPITHECID MONKEYS AND PLIOCENE PARAPAPIO FROM MAKAPANSGAT, SOUTH AFRICA USING ELLIPTICAL FOURIER ANALYSIS

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Dental microwear and stable isotopes inform the paleoecology of extinct hominins.

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A MORPHOMETRIC STUDY OF MAXILLARY POST CANINE DENTITION IN AUSTRALOPITHECUS AFRICANUS FROM STERKFONTEIN, SOUTH AFRICA: ONE SPECIES OR TWO?

The results support the acceptance of the null hypothesis, indicating that the dental remains from Sts Mbr.

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