RASE: recognition of alternatively spliced exons in C.elegans

@article{Rtsch2005RASERO,
  title={RASE: recognition of alternatively spliced exons in C.elegans},
  author={Gunnar R{\"a}tsch and S{\"o}ren Sonnenburg and Bernhard Sch{\"o}lkopf},
  journal={Bioinformatics},
  year={2005},
  volume={21 Suppl 1},
  pages={i369-77}
}
MOTIVATION Eukaryotic pre-mRNAs are spliced to form mature mRNA. Pre-mRNA alternative splicing greatly increases the complexity of gene expression. Estimates show that more than half of the human genes and at least one-third of the genes of less complex organisms, such as nematodes or flies, are alternatively spliced. In this work, we consider one major form of alternative splicing, namely the exclusion of exons from the transcript. It has been shown that alternatively spliced exons have… CONTINUE READING
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Although most recent computational studies on alternative splicing apply only to exons which are conserved among two species , our method only uses information that is available to the splicing machinery , i.e. the DNA sequence itself .
Although most recent computational studies on alternative splicing apply only to exons which are conserved among two species , our method only uses information that is available to the splicing machinery , i.e. the DNA sequence itself .
ExonsNo subtypeIntrons
We employ advanced machine learning techniques in order to answer the following two questions : ( 1 ) Is a certain exon alternatively spliced ? ( 2 ) How can we identify yet unidentified exons within known introns ? .
Combined with the above mentioned features we were able to identify 85.2% of skipped exons within known introns at a false positive rate of 1% .
IntronsNo subtypeExons
Combined with the above mentioned features we were able to identify 85.2% of skipped exons within known introns at a false positive rate of 1% .
We employ advanced machine learning techniques in order to answer the following two questions : ( 1 ) Is a certain exon alternatively spliced ? ( 2 ) How can we identify yet unidentified exons within known introns ? .
Although most recent computational studies on alternative splicing apply only to exons which are conserved among two species , our method only uses information that is available to the splicing machinery , i.e. the DNA sequence itself .
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