RAPID AND REPEATED ORIGIN OF INSULAR GIGANTISM AND DWARFISM IN AUSTRALIAN TIGER SNAKES

@article{Keogh2005RAPIDAR,
  title={RAPID AND REPEATED ORIGIN OF INSULAR GIGANTISM AND DWARFISM IN AUSTRALIAN TIGER SNAKES},
  author={J. Keogh and I. A. Scott and C. Hayes},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2005},
  volume={59}
}
  • J. Keogh, I. A. Scott, C. Hayes
  • Published 2005
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution
  • Abstract It is a well‐known phenomenon that islands can support populations of gigantic or dwarf forms of mainland conspecifics, but the variety of explanatory hypotheses for this phenomenon have been difficult to disentangle. The highly venomous Australian tiger snakes (genus Notechis) represent a well‐known and extreme example of insular body size variation. They are of special interest because there are multiple populations of dwarfs and giants and the age of the islands and thus the age of… CONTINUE READING
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