R. M. Hare's Achievements in Moral Philosophy

@article{Singer2002RMH,
  title={R. M. Hare's Achievements in Moral Philosophy},
  author={Peter Nicholas Singer},
  journal={Utilitas},
  year={2002},
  volume={14},
  pages={309 - 317}
}
  • P. Singer
  • Published 1 November 2002
  • Philosophy
  • Utilitas
In his Axel Hägerström Lectures, given in Sweden in 1991, Dick Hare referred to Hägerström as a pioneer in ethics who had made the most important breakthrough that there had been in ethics during the twentieth century. Although Hägerström's development of a nondescriptivist approach to ethics certainly was pioneering philosophical work, when the history of twentieth century ethics comes to be written, I believe that it is Hare's own work that will be seen as having made the most important… 

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References

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