Quercetin in men with category III chronic prostatitis: a preliminary prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

@article{Shoskes1999QuercetinIM,
  title={Quercetin in men with category III chronic prostatitis: a preliminary prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.},
  author={Daniel A. Shoskes and Scott I. Zeitlin and Asha R. Shahed and Jacob Rajfer},
  journal={Urology},
  year={1999},
  volume={54 6},
  pages={
          960-3
        }
}
OBJECTIVES The National Institutes of Health (NIH) category III chronic prostatitis syndromes (nonbacterial chronic prostatitis and prostatodynia) are common disorders with few effective therapies. [...] Key MethodMETHODS Thirty men with category IIIa and IIIb chronic pelvic pain syndrome were randomized in a double-blind fashion to receive either placebo or the bioflavonoid quercetin 500 mg twice daily for 1 month.Expand
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