Queer periods: attitudes toward and experiences with menstruation in the masculine of centre and transgender community

@article{Chrisler2016QueerPA,
  title={Queer periods: attitudes toward and experiences with menstruation in the masculine of centre and transgender community},
  author={Joan C. Chrisler and Jennifer A. Gorman and Jen Manion and Michael A. J. Murgo and Angela Barney and Alexis A. Adams-Clark and Jessica R. Newton and Meaghan McGrath},
  journal={Culture, Health \& Sexuality},
  year={2016},
  volume={18},
  pages={1238 - 1250}
}
Abstract Menstruation has long been viewed as an important aspect of women’s health. However, scholars and healthcare providers have only recently begun to recognise that transgender men and people with masculine gender identities also menstruate, thus little is known about their attitudes toward and experiences with menstruation. A sample of masculine of centre and transgender individuals with a mean age of 30 years was recruited online to complete measures of attitudes toward menstruation and… 
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