Queen regulates biogenic amine level and nestmate recognition in workers of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta

@article{VanderMeer2008QueenRB,
  title={Queen regulates biogenic amine level and nestmate recognition in workers of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta},
  author={Robert K. Vander Meer and Catherine A. Preston and Abraham Hefetz},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2008},
  volume={95},
  pages={1155-1158}
}
Nestmate recognition is a critical element in social insect organization, providing a means to maintain territoriality and close the colony to parasites and predators. Ants detect the colony chemical label via their antennae and respond to the label mismatch of an intruder with aggressive behavior. In the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, worker ability to recognize conspecific nonnestmates decreases if the colony queen is removed, such that they do not recognize conspecific nonnestmates as… Expand
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