Queen Ants Make Distinctive Sounds That Are Mimicked by a Butterfly Social Parasite

@article{Barbero2009QueenAM,
  title={Queen Ants Make Distinctive Sounds That Are Mimicked by a Butterfly Social Parasite},
  author={Francesca Barbero and Jeremy A. Thomas and Simona Bonelli and Emilio Balletto and Karsten Sch{\"o}nrogge},
  journal={Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={323},
  pages={782 - 785}
}
Ants dominate terrestrial ecosystems through living in complex societies whose organization is maintained via sophisticated communication systems. The role of acoustics in information exchange may be underestimated. We show that Myrmica schencki queens generate distinctive sounds that elicit increased benevolent responses from workers, reinforcing their supreme social status. Although fiercely defended by workers, ant societies are infiltrated by specialist insects that exploit their resources… Expand
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