Quantum supremacy using a programmable superconducting processor

@article{Arute2019QuantumSU,
  title={Quantum supremacy using a programmable superconducting processor},
  author={Frank Arute and Kunal Arya and Ryan Babbush and Dave Bacon and Joseph C. Bardin and Rami Barends and Rupak Biswas and Sergio Boixo and Fernando G. S. L. Brand{\~a}o and David A. Buell and Brian Burkett and Yu Chen and Zijun Chen and Benjamin Chiaro and Roberto Collins and William Courtney and Andrew Dunsworth and Edward Farhi and Brooks Foxen and Austin G. Fowler and Craig Gidney and Marissa Giustina and Rob Graff and Keith Guerin and Steve Habegger and Matthew P. Harrigan and Michael J. Hartmann and Alan K. Ho and Markus Hoffmann and Trent Huang and T. Humble and Sergei V. Isakov and Evan Jeffrey and Zhang Jiang and Dvir Kafri and Kostyantyn Kechedzhi and Julian Kelly and Paul Klimov and Sergey Knysh and Alexander N. Korotkov and Fedor Kostritsa and David Landhuis and Mike Lindmark and Erik Lucero and Dmitry I. Lyakh and Salvatore Mandr{\`a} and Jarrod R. McClean and Matthew J. McEwen and Anthony Megrant and Xiao Mi and Kristel Michielsen and Masoud Mohseni and Josh Mutus and Ofer Naaman and Matthew Neeley and Charles J. Neill and Murphy Yuezhen Niu and Eric P. Ostby and Andre Petukhov and John C. Platt and Chris Quintana and Eleanor Gilbert Rieffel and Pedram Roushan and Nicholas C Rubin and Daniel Thomas Sank and Kevin J Satzinger and Vadim N. Smelyanskiy and Kevin Sung and Matthew D Trevithick and Amit Vainsencher and Benjamin Villalonga and Theodore White and Z. Yao and Ping Yeh and Adam Zalcman and Hartmut Neven and John M. Martinis},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2019},
  volume={574},
  pages={505-510}
}
The promise of quantum computers is that certain computational tasks might be executed exponentially faster on a quantum processor than on a classical processor1. A fundamental challenge is to build a high-fidelity processor capable of running quantum algorithms in an exponentially large computational space. Here we report the use of a processor with programmable superconducting qubits2–7 to create quantum states on 53 qubits, corresponding to a computational state-space of dimension 253 (about… 

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