Quantum cryptography beyond quantum key distribution

@article{Broadbent2016QuantumCB,
  title={Quantum cryptography beyond quantum key distribution},
  author={Anne Broadbent and Christian Schaffner},
  journal={Designs, Codes, and Cryptography},
  year={2016},
  volume={78},
  pages={351 - 382}
}
Quantum cryptography is the art and science of exploiting quantum mechanical effects in order to perform cryptographic tasks. While the most well-known example of this discipline is quantum key distribution (QKD), there exist many other applications such as quantum money, randomness generation, secure two- and multi-party computation and delegated quantum computation. Quantum cryptography also studies the limitations and challenges resulting from quantum adversaries—including the impossibility… 

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