Quantum correlations between light and the kilogram-mass mirrors of LIGO

@article{Yu2020QuantumCB,
  title={Quantum correlations between light and the kilogram-mass mirrors of LIGO},
  author={Haocun Yu and L. McCuller and M. Tse and L. Barsotti and N. Mavalvala and J. Betzwieser and C. Blair and S. Dwyer and A. Effler and M. Evans and {\'A}. Fern{\'a}ndez-Galiana and P. Fritschel and V. Frolov and N. Kijbunchoo and F. Matichard and D. McClelland and T. Mcrae and A. Mullavey and D. Sigg and B. Slagmolen and C. Whittle and A. Buikema and Y. Chen and T. Corbitt and R. Schnabel and R. Abbott and C. Adams and R. Adhikari and A. Ananyeva and S. Appert and K. Arai and J. Areeda and Y. Asali and S. Aston and C. Austin and A. Baer and M. Ball and S. Ballmer and S. Banagiri and D. Barker and J. Bartlett and B. K. Berger and D. Bhattacharjee and G. Billingsley and S. Biscans and R. Blair and N. Bode and P. Booker and R. Bork and A. Bramley and A. Brooks and D. Brown and C. Cahillane and K. Cannon and X. Chen and A. Ciobanu and F. Clara and S. Cooper and K. Corley and S. Countryman and P. B. Covas and D. Coyne and L. Datrier and D. Davis and C. D. Fronzo and K. Dooley and J. Driggers and P. Dupej and T. Etzel and T. Evans and J. Feicht and P. Fulda and M. Fyffe and J. Giaime and K. Giardina and P. Godwin and E. Goetz and S. Gras and C. Gray and R. Gray and A. Green and Anchal Gupta and E. Gustafson and R. Gustafson and J. Hanks and J. Hanson and T. Hardwick and R. Hasskew and M. Heintze and A. Helmling-Cornell and N. Holland and J. Jones and S. Kandhasamy and S. Karki and M. Kasprzack and K. Kawabe and P. King and J. Kissel and Rahul Kumar and M. Landry and B. Lane and B. Lantz and M. Laxen and Y. Lecoeuche and J. Leviton and J. Liu and M. Lormand and A. Lundgren and R. Macas and M. Macinnis and D. Macleod and G. Mansell and S. M'arka and Z. M'arka and D. Martynov and K. Mason and T. Massinger and R. McCarthy and S. McCormick and J. Mciver and G. Mendell and K. Merfeld and E. Merilh and F. Meylahn and T. Mistry and R. Mittleman and G. Moreno and C. Mow-Lowry and S. Mozzon and T. Nelson and P. Nguyen and L. Nuttall and J. Oberling and R. Oram and C. Osthelder and D. Ottaway and H. Overmier and J. Palamos and W. Parker and E. Payne and A. Pele and C. Perez and M. Pirello and H. Radkins and K. Ramirez and J. Richardson and K. Riles and N. Robertson and J. Rollins and C. Romel and J. Romie and M. Ross and K. Ryan and T. Sadecki and E. Sanchez and L. Sanchez and T. R. Saravanan and R. Savage and D. Schaetzl and R. Schofield and E. Schwartz and D. Sellers and T. Shaffer and J. Smith and S. Soni and B. Sorazu and A. Spencer and K. Strain and L. Sun and M. J. Szczepa'nczyk and M. Thomas and P. Thomas and K. Thorne and K. Toland and C. Torrie and G. Traylor and A. Urban and G. Vajente and G. Valdes and D. Vander-Hyde and P. Veitch and K. Venkateswara and Gautam Venugopalan and A. Viets and T. Vo and C. Vorvick and M. Wade and R. Ward and J. Warner and B. Weaver and R. Weiss and B. Willke and C. Wipf and L. Xiao and H. Yamamoto and Hang Yu and L. Zhang and M. Zucker and J. Zweizig},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2020},
  volume={583},
  pages={43-47}
}
The measurement of minuscule forces and displacements with ever greater precision is inhibited by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which imposes a limit to the precision with which the position of an object can be measured continuously, known as the standard quantum limit 1 – 4 . When light is used as the probe, the standard quantum limit arises from the balance between the uncertainties of the photon radiation pressure applied to the object and of the photon number in the photoelectric… Expand

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