Quantum Theory Needs No ‘Interpretation’

@article{Fuchs2000QuantumTN,
  title={Quantum Theory Needs No ‘Interpretation’},
  author={Christopher A. Fuchs and Asher Peres},
  journal={Physics Today},
  year={2000},
  volume={53},
  pages={70-71}
}
Purpose of this article is to stress the fact that Quantum Theory does not need an interpretation other than being an algorithm for computing probabilities associated with macroscopic phenomena and measurements. It does not ''describ'' reality, and the wave function is not objective entity, it only gives the evolution of our probabilities for the outcomes potential experiments. (AIP) (c) 

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Fuchs (cfuchs@lanl.gov) Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico Asher Peres (peres@photon.technion.ac.il) Technion—Israel Institute of Technology Haifa

  • Fuchs (cfuchs@lanl.gov) Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico Asher Peres (peres@photon.technion.ac.il) Technion—Israel Institute of Technology Haifa

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