Quantum Probability from Subjective Likelihood: improving on Deutsch's proof of the probability rule

@article{Wallace2003QuantumPF,
  title={Quantum Probability from Subjective Likelihood: improving on Deutsch's proof of the probability rule},
  author={D. Wallace},
  journal={Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics},
  year={2003},
  volume={38},
  pages={311-332}
}
  • D. Wallace
  • Published 18 December 2003
  • Computer Science
  • Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics
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