Quantum-Mechanical Computers

@article{Lloyd1995QuantumMechanicalC,
  title={Quantum-Mechanical Computers},
  author={S. Lloyd},
  journal={Scientific American},
  year={1995},
  volume={273},
  pages={140-145}
}
  • S. Lloyd
  • Published 1995
  • Physics
  • Scientific American
E very two years for the past 50, computers have become twice as fast while their components have become half as big. Circuits now contain wires and transistors that measure only one hundredth of a human hair in width. Because of this explosive progress, today’s machines are millions of times more powerful than their crude ancestors. But explosions do eventually dissipate, and integrated-circuit technology is running up against its limits. Advanced lithographic techniques can yield parts /100… Expand
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References

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TLDR
Las Vegas algorithms for finding discrete logarithms and factoring integers on a quantum computer that take a number of steps which is polynomial in the input size, e.g., the number of digits of the integer to be factored are given. Expand
Quantum theory, the Church–Turing principle and the universal quantum computer
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It is argued that underlying the Church–Turing hypothesis there is an implicit physical assertion. Here, this assertion is presented explicitly as a physical principle: ‘every finitely realizibleExpand
Quantum Mechanical Models of Turing Machines That Dissipate No Energy
Quantum mechanical Hamiltonian models of Turing machines are constructed here on a finite lattice of spin-\textonehalf{} systems. The models do not dissipate any energy and they operate at theExpand