Quantitative Trait Loci and Epistasis for Crown Freezing Tolerance in the ‘Kanota’ × ‘Ogle’ Hexaploid Oat Mapping Population

@article{Wooten2008QuantitativeTL,
  title={Quantitative Trait Loci and Epistasis for Crown Freezing Tolerance in the ‘Kanota’ × ‘Ogle’ Hexaploid Oat Mapping Population},
  author={David R. Wooten and David Livingston and James Brendan Holland and David S. Marshall and J. Paul Murphy},
  journal={Crop Science},
  year={2008},
  volume={48},
  pages={149-157}
}
Crown freezing tolerance is the most important factor conferring oat (Avena spp.) winter hardiness. The objective of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for crown freezing tolerance in the ‘Kanota’ × ‘Ogle’ recombinant inbred line (RIL) mapping population and to examine their relationship with other winter hardiness traits. One hundred thirty-fi ve RILs were evaluated for crown freezing tolerance in a controlled environment. Previously published molecular marker and linkage… Expand

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