Quantitative Genetics, Inclusive Fitness, and Group Selection

@article{Queller1992QuantitativeGI,
  title={Quantitative Genetics, Inclusive Fitness, and Group Selection},
  author={David C. Queller},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1992},
  volume={139},
  pages={540 - 558}
}
  • D. Queller
  • Published 1 March 1992
  • Biology
  • The American Naturalist
Inclusive-fitness models have been criticized because they give incorrect results for cases in which fitness components interact nonadditively. However, this failure is not due to anything intrinsic to the inclusive-fitness viewpoint. It stems from an essentially quantitative genetic feature of the model, an attempt to separate fitness terms from genetic terms. A general rule is provided for determining when such a separation is justified. This rule is used to show how Price's covariance… 
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