Quantitative Analysis of the Timing of the Origin and Diversification of Extant Placental Orders

@article{Archibald2004QuantitativeAO,
  title={Quantitative Analysis of the Timing of the Origin and Diversification of Extant Placental Orders},
  author={J. David. Archibald and Douglas H. Deutschman},
  journal={Journal of Mammalian Evolution},
  year={2004},
  volume={8},
  pages={107-124}
}
Fossil evidence is consistent with origination and diversification of extant placental orders in the early Tertiary (Explosive Model), and with the possibility of some orders having stem taxa extending into the Cretaceous (Long Fuse Model). Fossil evidence that 15 of 18 extant placental orders appeared and began diversification in the first 16 m.y. of the Cenozoic is, however, at odds with molecular studies arguing some orders diversified up to 40 m.y. earlier in the Early Cretaceous (Short… Expand

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