Quantifying the light sensitivity of Calanus spp. during the polar night: potential for orchestrated migrations conducted by ambient light from the sun, moon, or aurora borealis?

@article{Btnes2013QuantifyingTL,
  title={Quantifying the light sensitivity of Calanus spp. during the polar night: potential for orchestrated migrations conducted by ambient light from the sun, moon, or aurora borealis?},
  author={Anna Solvang B{\aa}tnes and Cecilie Miljeteig and J{\o}rgen Berge and Michael J. Greenacre and Geir Johnsen},
  journal={Polar Biology},
  year={2013},
  volume={38},
  pages={51-65}
}
Recent studies have shown that the biological activity during the Arctic polar night is higher than previously thought. Zooplankton perform diel vertical migration during the dark period/winter, with the calanoid copepods Calanus spp. being one of the main taxa assumed to contribute to the observed diel vertical migration. We investigated the sensitivity of field-collected Calanus spp. to irradiance by keeping individuals in an aquarium and exposing them to gradually increasing irradiance in… 

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