Quantifying free-roaming domestic cat predation using animal-borne video cameras

@article{Loyd2013QuantifyingFD,
  title={Quantifying free-roaming domestic cat predation using animal-borne video cameras},
  author={Kerrie Anne Therese Loyd and Sonia M. Hernandez and John Carroll and Kyler J. Abernathy and Greg J. Marshall},
  journal={Biological Conservation},
  year={2013},
  volume={160},
  pages={183-189}
}

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