Quality improvement in neurology: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis quality measures: report of the quality measurement and reporting subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

@article{Miller2013QualityII,
  title={Quality improvement in neurology: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis quality measures: report of the quality measurement and reporting subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.},
  author={Robert H. Miller and Benjamin R. Brooks and Rebecca J. Swain-Eng and Robert C. Basner and Gregory T Carter and Patricia Casey and Adam B. Cohen and Richard Dubinsky and Dallas A. Forshew and Carlayne E. Jackson and Ed Kasarskis and Nicholas J Procaccini and Mohammed Sanjak and Fredrik P Tolin},
  journal={Neurology},
  year={2013},
  volume={81 24},
  pages={2136-40}
}
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a lethal, progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of motor neurons.(1) Patients with ALS lose function in the limbs, speech, swallowing, and breathing muscles. The cause of the disease is still not known for most patients. Approximately 25,000 people in the United States have ALS, and 5,000 people are diagnosed with ALS annually in the United States.(1) Most patients die from respiratory failure 2 to 5 years after onset of symptoms… CONTINUE READING