Puzzlingly High Correlations in fMRI Studies of Emotion, Personality, and Social Cognition 1

@article{Vul2009PuzzlinglyHC,
  title={Puzzlingly High Correlations in fMRI Studies of Emotion, Personality, and Social Cognition 1},
  author={E. Vul and C. Harris and P. Winkielman and H. Pashler},
  journal={Perspectives on Psychological Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={4},
  pages={274 - 290}
}
  • E. Vul, C. Harris, +1 author H. Pashler
  • Published 2009
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Perspectives on Psychological Science
  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studiesofemotion, personality, and social cognition have drawn much attention in recent years, with high-profile studies frequently reporting extremely high (e.g., >.8) correlations between brain activation and personality measures. We show that these correlations are higher than should be expected given the (evidently limited) reliability of both fMRI and personality measures. The high correlations are all the more puzzling because method sections… CONTINUE READING
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