Putting to rest the myth of creatine supplementation leading to muscle cramps and dehydration

@article{Dalbo2008PuttingTR,
  title={Putting to rest the myth of creatine supplementation leading to muscle cramps and dehydration},
  author={Vincent J Dalbo and Michael D. Roberts and Jeffrey R Stout and Chad M. Kerksick},
  journal={British Journal of Sports Medicine},
  year={2008},
  volume={42},
  pages={567 - 573}
}
Creatine is one of the most popular athletic supplements with sales surpassing 400 million dollars in 2004. Due to the popularity and efficacy of creatine supplementation over 200 studies have examined the effects of creatine on athletic performance. Despite the abundance of research suggesting the effectiveness and safety of creatine, a fallacy appears to exist among the general public, driven by media claims and anecdotal reports, that creatine supplementation can result in muscle cramps and… Expand
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